Hello. I am Alan Stoob, Britain’s Premier Nazi Hunter

Alan Stoob Nazi Hunter by Saul WordsworthAlan is married to Edame. They’re due to retire to Bournemouth. They love a Bergerac box set and an afternoon session on the port. They’ve had their troubles, past indiscretions that occasionally return to bother them, troubled offspring with complex families of their own.

But it’s a loving relationship – fun and fruity. Well as fruity as Alan can manage. Broadly all is calm in Dunstable, Beds, until the original Nazi Hunter and fax-lover Simon Weisenthal recruits Alan out of retirement to take over his mission.

And so the thriller begins. Continue reading

Get out of the way

I love this Future of Work Manifesto. I love its breathiness and its completeness.

I particularly like its redrawing of the role of the manager. The manager is so often the barrier to change, the obstacle to progression and the most conservative, self-protectionist role in an organisation.

I think managers should be the ‘keeper of the story’. The role of management should be to ‘get out of the way’.

Great thinking, I think I’ll be following Maddie Grant. Also like that she’s a self confessed potty mouth. We could get on.

 

 

Once more unto the breach – National Child Measurement Programme

It takes some effort to protest – who is going to listen.

But as Sir Billy says, (and I endlessly repeat) cynicism is the enemy of progress, not those who oppose us.

So I took time to reply to the letters I’d received, fully expecting not to hear another word, perhaps being filed in the ‘trolls’ drawers at best, bins at worst. But lo and behold, another crop of responses appeared.

Having pointed out to Vince Cable that he’d misunderstood my letter, he took up my case. He replied saying “Thank you for your further email.  I now understand rather better why you are concerned.  I agree that it is absurd, and perhaps worse, for the NHS to be guiding perfectly normal children towards dieting and for misleading letters to be sent out causing alarm amongst parents.  I will write to the RTCH along these lines.”

And he did, he wrote to Frank Sims, CEO of Hounslow and Richmond Community Healthcare NHS Trust. He emailed him, copying me. And using the phrase “It may be this is a diktat from the DoH.  Perhaps you could let me know and I will take this up with a Minister.”

Diktat. Wonderful word. Meaning “an order or decree imposed by someone in power without popular consent.”

Continue reading

Bambajam – Sustainable Music for Families and Schools

janeyfranklin:

I wanted to write a post about my friends LeeAnn and Duncan and their inspiring new business Bambajam, but Andrea beat me to it and did a great job, so I’m reblogging her content.

Bambajam is a social enterprise, it is earth friendly and at its heart is inspiring children of all ages to come together learn to play music. In a world that is seemingly increasingly seeing education as ‘training for the workplace’, I see immense value in creative learning and opening minds. Anyway, please read and enjoy. And if you can, support them by spreading the word, buying an instrument or backing their Indiegogo campaign: https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/bambajam-beautifully-handcrafted-eco-friendly-musical-instrument

Originally posted on SingaporeKids365:

My friends, I wanted to share a really remarkable moment for two of my great friends Duncan and Lee Ann McKee. Nine years ago, they launched STIX, Motivation Through Music. I was present at their very first corporate gig, and it was an amazing experience. Nearly 100 people, coming together, playing Beethoven’s “Ode to Joy” with nothing more than a couple of plastic tubes. It was a special moment for everyone in the room.

Lee Ann and Duncan in Action

Roll the clock forward nearly a decade and STIX has been a great success, but they’re not the kind of people to be idle, so they’ve been busy creating something else. For the last two years, they’ve focused on moving this skill beyond business, because they believe everyone can play music – young or old. But it’s not just about the music for Lee Ann and Duncan, they also…

View original 617 more words

What happened next? A hearing or a fobbing off?

I wrote to my MP Vince Cable, the headmaster, Public Health Richmond and Public Health England.

The headmaster raised the issue with the Director of Public Health for Richmond and at the local Headmasters Forum.

Vince Cable wrote back to me. It came across as though he had not read my letter properly. Either that or it was waffle to fill a reply in the hopes I’d go away, since my issue wasn’t on his political agenda. Continue reading

So I wrote a letter to our Headteacher…

NCMP Scan of original letter censored… and I’m very pleased to say that he replied. He expressed his concern about the letter I’d received. There will be a note in the school newsletter next week to parents on the topic and he is going to raise it with the Local Authorities at the next Headteachers Forum.

The letter I wrote to him is below, a tiny bit anonymised. I’ve forwarded this on to my MP Vince Cable and the contact in the Obesity Team at Public Health England that Civic Centre lady gave me. I wonder if I’ll hear back from them? Continue reading

Irresponsible, ill-advised, ill-supported and inflammatory – the Government’s approach to a healthy child

Finding some answers

As soon as I was able, I called the number on the letter which signed off ‘from the School Nursing Service’.

I was put through to a school nurse, albeit not the one attached to my child’s school and I asked her why I had been sent a letter informing me that my child is ‘obese’. And I asked where I could get some advice for what exactly to do about it since the links in the letter gave me nothing specific at all about managing the weight of an obese four year old.

She explained to me that although the letter was signed off from the School Nursing Service, they had not sent it. It came from the Richmond Public Health. The nurses had taken part in the National Child Measurement Programme – their role had been to weigh and measure the children and submit the data.

This was the first year that the government had decided to send automated letters to the parents.

But she could not give me any advice as she had no information to give me – she couldn’t tell me what weight he should be, what portion size I should serve or anything. She didn’t know how the Government had arrived at the conclusion about my child – how they calculated BMI.

I was baffled! The number I was given in the letter for ‘free local support’ could not offer me any. Continue reading